10 Top Tips for Progressing from Mountain Leader to Mountaineering & Climbing Instructor

10 Top Tips for Progressing from Mountain Leader to Mountaineering & Climbing Instructor

Congratulations! You’ve passed your assessment, and you’re now a Mountain Leader. That might be as far as you want to go with outdoor qualifications, and that’s fine – well done for getting this far. But on the other hand you might want to progress further and go for Winter Mountain Leader (winter ML), Mountaineering & Climbing Instructor Award (MCI), or International Mountain Leader (IML). We’ll be focusing on MCI here. It is a big step up, but here are some tips to make it easier.

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Our Top Twenty Most Successful Blog Posts

Our Top Twenty Most Successful Blog Posts

Since December 2016 we’ve been tracking the performance of our blog posts, so we that we can keep up with what kind of content our followers like to read. Often, something that we think will be really useful and interesting doesn’t turn out to be very popular, and vice versa. And the results, as of 31st March 2019, in reverse order, are…

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How To Avoid The Most Common Climbing Injury  

How To Avoid The Most Common Climbing Injury   

 Several years ago whilst running a climbing wall session as part of a Single Pitch Award assessment course, I got on the wall to demo a move and pop!! Everyone in the room heard it. I was properly warmed up, the hold I was pulling on wasn’t tiny, my feet didn’t slip – but I had definitely damaged a flexor pulley in one of my fingers. Pulley injuries are the most common finger injury in climbers, and A2 pulley injuries most common. Here’s an overview of pulley injuries, how to avoid them, and what to do if it happens to you.

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Rope Skills & Rescues #2: How To Pass A Knot

Rope Skills & Rescues #2: How To Pass A Knot

The first post in this series showed how to escape the system. If you find yourself needing to lower your second off, due to injury or not being able to get up the climb, you might need to tie two ropes together to make 100m of rope – enough to lower someone to the ground on most crags in the UK. You'll then need to pass the knot around the belay device - here's how to do it

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